Australia and New Zealand have already blocked mobil

  using equipment from Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of telecommunications equipment, over security concerns.

  The United States has made it clear that any country that uses Huawei will find its opportunities to work with Was

hington limited. In a speech in Munich on Saturday, Vice President Mike Pence described the company as a “threat.”

  ”Chinese law requires them to provide Beijing’s vast security apparatus with access to any data that touches their networks or equipment,” Pence said.

  The RUSI report reached a similar conclusion, saying that although Huawei may be a pri

vate company, China’s national security laws required cooperation with authorities when requested.

  ”Huawei’s Chinese staff have no choice but to accede to requests from Chinese government departments,” the report said.

  The Chinese government has denied it would demand access to Huawei’s technology for spying, and the company has said it would refuse such a request.

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Modi reforms for foreign investment worth applause

India has accelerated its efforts to make it easier to do business in the country. As China’s labor cost ad

vantage shrinks, Chinese enterprises should pay attention to changes in the Indian economy.

In 2018, India saw more than $38 billion of inbound deals, outnumbering t

hat of China for the first time in two decades, the Economic Times reported. India is

moving in the right direction to make foreign investment a powerful engine for economic growth and poverty alleviation. It

is the same strategy adopted by China three decades ago at the initial stage of its industrialization process.

Ahead of a general election, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is facing growing discont

ent as people question whether his reforms can create enough jobs for young people. But the foreign inve

stment figures suggest that Modi has done a good job in addressing unemployment.

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ina’s monetary policy to sail out of the ‘reefs’ and into

The year 2018 saw China’s monetary policy carefully sail through the “reefs,” as economic slowd

own and surging exchange rate risk left little room for adjustment. However, since the be

ginning of this year, major internal and external changes have broken the dilemma.

From the internal perspective, in January 2019, the “loose credit s

upply” saw improvement in terms of both volume and structure, barriers to implem

enting monetary policy removed, which is expected to guide the Chinese economy to stabilize in the first quarter.

First of all, China’s outstanding broad money supply, or M2, grew 8.4 percent year-on-year in January, while new yuan loans and social fina

ncing both soared to historic monthly highs at 3.23 trillion yuan ($478 billion) and 4.64 trillion yu

an, respectively. The figures showed that “loose fiscal policy” has had a positive effect on credit supply to the pri

vate sector, thus pushing up the growth rate for total social financing. It is expected that in the first quarter of 2019, wi

th the gradual implementation of “loose fiscal policy,” the volume of “loose credit supply” will remain at a high level.

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But Myanmar still has some obstacles to deal with in order to attr

act foreign capital. The first is instability in the job market and relatively low labor efficiency. Particularly, the recent years have seen an increasing number of strikes and th

e failure of the government to ease industrial relations conflicts with effective measures has crippled investor confidence in the country. Some foreign ente

rprises even withdrew from Myanmar and shifted to neighboring countries, denting the image of the nation.

Second, Myanmar’s backward infrastructure may deter potential investors. A small number of power generation facil

ities and fragmented grids cannot ensure stable and sufficient power supply. Access to electricity is li

mited to only 26 percent of the population, impeding Myanmar’s economic development.

Third, some Myanmese are prejudiced against foreign investment. Worrying that Myanmar’s ec

onomic and social interests may be impaired, they turned their backs on foreign investment. De

monstrators rallied in Kachin State to demand the government permanently halt the Myitsone dam project, without giving any

constructive suggestion on the follow-up arrangements. It’s fair to say some movements against foreign-inv

ested projects, driven by nationalism and so-called environmental concern, are of no help in improving the country’s inv

estment environment, and have hijacked economic development. Respecting the spirit of the contract is a bas

ic requirement for modern states and their people. Myanmar State Councilor Aung San Suu Kyi recently said an a

dministration shouldn’t terminate foreign-invested projects approved by its predecessor.

www.daochuwan.cn

Meanwhile, Japan continued signing agreements with other

one with the UK in 2017 and another with India the following year. By exploiting the power of these regional countries, Japan aims to secure military provisions for its SDF in t

he Indo-Pacific region from the US, Canada, Australia and India and in the North Atlantic region from the US, the UK, France and Canada.

This has laid the foundation for Japan to broaden its SDF activities and ensure military provision with its par

tners. It is a small-scale bilateral military alliance system centered on Japan. This shows Japan’s long-term strategic plan.

Since the 21st century, Japan has clearly labeled China as its biggest real and potential rival. Especially since Shinzo Abe took office, he spared no efforts at contai

ning China. During Abe’s first term, the Japanese government raised the idea of the “arc of freedom and prosperity.” When

he became prime minister for a second time, the policies advocated by his cabinet, including the values-based alliance, the alliance of

maritime democracies, the democratic security diamond and the freedom corridor, have all kept China in focus.

Because of the ACSAs with Australia and India, Japan can militarily constrain China’s Belt and Road Initiative in the Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. In the A

tlantic, it can also exert forceful intervention in China’s policy in Europe, North Africa and West Africa.

In some areas where China’s military strength has not reached, Japan has crafted its military pla

n in advance by utilizing its bilateral alliance system, trap-falling China’s military strategy into a passive position.

njLongrun.cn

The 67-year-old princess, the eldest daughter of the late King

Bhumibol Adulyadej and sister of the present King, married an American and relinquished her title in 1972. After returning to Th

ailand in 2001 following her divorce, she resumed royal duties and enjoyed prestige among the Thai people, although her royal title has not yet been restored.

Around 20 military coups have taken place in Thailand since the country became a constitutional mo

narchy in 1932. The Constitution was also amended in 2017 during the military government’s rule.

In this context, the Thai Raksa Chart party (Thai Save The Nation, or TSN) tried to break the v

icious circle in Thailand’s politics by nominating Ubolratana as the prime ministerial candid

ate. The probability of her winning the election would have been high if she were allowed to contest. Her victory would have brought back political sta

bility to some extent. TSN is linked to former Thai leader Thaksin Shinawatra, who enjoys popular appeal in the country. Thaksin carried out several pol

icies that benefited the grass roots and won him their support. Even though he was ousted in 2006, his influence remains strong.

In the upcoming election, I believe pro-Thaksin parties can still have high public app

roval ratings. But considering the latest military-drafted constitution which gives considerable

rights to bureaucrats and military, it is still not known whether a pro-Thaksin politician can be elected prime minister.

www.hnxkmh.com

Thailand’s political changes mirror those of Southeast Asiawhich

 is a region in transition. Since the beginning of the 21st century, thi

s region has come across political struggle between new capitalistic groups and old b

ureaucratic factions, as well as political turmoil as a result of the huge gap between the rich and poor.

Indonesia is also going to hold a presidential election in April. These upcoming electi

ons have sent a clear signal that Southeast Asian countries long for political stability and development.

The Thai election can give confidence to other countries in the region. After all, with very few exc

eptions, the junta can return power to the people through elections.

As for China-Thailand relations, historically, no matter which

government came to power after several coups, the direction of bilateral ties has never chang

ed. The cooperation between China and Thailand has become the common  aspiration  of the  two peoples and is in their mutual interest.

hnxkmh.com

German Chancellor Angela Merkel expressed the hope on Febru

that China should be involved in international disarmament efforts. “We would of course be glad if such talks were held not j

ust between the United States, Europe and Russia but also with China,” said Merkel at the 55th Munich Security Conference.

Her remarks were clearly directed against Washington and Moscow’s withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty.

Yang Jiechi, a member of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China Central Committee,

who was also present at the conference, reiterated that “we [China] are opposed to the multilateralization of INF.”

The INF treaty concerns Europe and Germany’s interests. The US took the lead in abandoning INF, resulting in the collapse of the arms control system.

It is understandable that Berlin is anxious, but Merkel’s hasty call for Beijing is rath

er inappropriate. Her words disrespect China’s interests and wishes, and objectively encourage Washington to quit irresponsibly.

www.jsLongsun.com

Washington alleged that INF failed because Moscow did not

ply with INF and Beijing was not bound by the treaty. These were its main excuses for the withdrawal.

Germany believes that the more countries involved in INF, the better. However, ma

ny European countries can never understand the security risks and the urgency to strengthen national defense in other regions.

The INF Treaty was signed by the US and the Soviet Union. It was a compromise bet

ween the two superpowers with the same level of military power to ease their confrontations.

Although China is now much stronger than it was in the past, its nuclear power and compreh

ensive military strength are far from being equal to those of the US and conducting negotiations on an equal footing.

The Europeans are clear that the US withdrawal from the INF Treaty is part of its America First agenda and an abandonment of its international obligations.

At the Munich security conference, Merkel and European countries criticized recent US security policies. But on the issue of the

INF treaty, Merkel snubbed China to serve US interests, reflecting the selfishness of Germans and some Europeans.

jsLongsun.com

he increased bank lending could match the real econom

The monetary authority has rolled out a series of policies in recent mont

hs to ensure adequate liquidity in the financial sector and accelerated loan issuance to co

mpanies. The measures include a new lending facility, called the targeted medium-term lending facility, which was in

troduced in December to encourage commercial banks to increase lending to small and private firms.

The central bank further cut the required reserve ratio for financial institutions by 1 percentage point in January and inj

ected another 800 billion yuan of capital into the market. That followed four reserve ratio cuts last year.

Supported by the liquidity, the average interest rate in financial mark

ets had already declined by January, which actually provided much cheaper funding t

o commercial banks and borrowers in the corporate sector, Sun said.

Accompanied by the credit boost, growth of the broad money sup

ply, or M2, accelerated in January to 8.4 percent from 8.1 percent at the end of December, t

he central bank said. Government bond issuance, meanwhile, has also picked up since the start of this year.

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